Lakeside Property

Milwaukee County Government Chris Abele demolishes his $2.6 million lakefront mansion in …

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Uncooked video of the final phases of the tear-down of a house in 3500 block of N. Lake Drive in Shorewood owned by County Government Chris Abele.
Michael Sears, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

That was quick.

Milwaukee County Government Chris Abele on Wednesday tore down his $2.6 million mansion, simply days after getting permission from Shorewood to demolish the house.

The transfer comes after greater than 1,00zero individuals signed a web based petition opposing the demolition. The household who offered Abele the 9,762-square-foot lakefront dwelling late final 12 months additionally spoke out towards his determination to tear down the mansion, saying he by no means disclosed his plans throughout their conversations.

On Wednesday, teams of individuals gathered on sidewalks close to the house, 3534 N. Lake Drive, and watched as crews ripped off the roof, knocked down brick partitions and tore out surrounding bushes.

By early afternoon, the mansion was lowered to rubble.

Bicyclists pause to see the last of the demolition underway at the property of Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele. The mansion he purchased is being razed at 3534 N. Lake Drive, Shorewood.

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Onlookers gather to see the demolition of the mansion Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele purchased at 3534 N. Lake Drive in Shorewood.

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The demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion on Lake Drive began Wednesday. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, will be the site of Abele's new home.

Purchase Photograph

The demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion on Lake Drive began Wednesday. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, will be the site of Abele's new home.

Purchase Photograph

The demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion on Lake Drive began Wednesday. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, will be the site of Abele's new home.

Purchase Photograph

The demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion on Lake Drive began Wednesday. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, will be the site of Abele's new home.

Purchase Photograph

The demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion on Lake Drive began Wednesday. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, will be the site of Abele's new home.

Purchase Photograph

A woman stops to take a photo of the demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, will be the site of Abele's new home.

Purchase Photograph

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A spokeswoman for Abele mentioned he had no additional remark. 

Final month, Abele — the son of a Boston billionaire — advised the Journal Sentinel that he and his fiancée, Jennifer Gonda, love the neighborhood and are “dedicated to a design that respects and honors it.”

Village Legal professional Nathan Bayer mentioned Shorewood’s Design Overview Board didn’t have authority to determine whether or not the home ought to be demolished throughout a gathering earlier this month.

In-built 1927, the residence was often called the Charles and Laura Albright Home, for the unique house owners of the property. The Mediterranean Revival mansion was designed by architect Alexander C. Eschweiler, who was accountable for a lot of landmark Milwaukee buildings and mansions.  

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A lady stops to take a photograph of the demolition of a historic Shorewood mansion. The property, owned by Milwaukee County Government Chris Abele, would be the web site of Abele’s new dwelling. (Photograph: Michael Sears/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

The board was as an alternative suggested to concentrate on the location restoration plan, which explains how the location could be maintained earlier than Abele’s new house is constructed. The contractor, Barenz Builders, plans to fill the location till development begins in November.

After studying of Abele’s controversial plans, some residents have began pushing the Shorewood Village Board to think about an ordinance that might defend historic properties. 

The Shorewood Historic Society proposed a historic preservation ordinance about 10 years in the past, but it surely was by no means permitted by the board.

Presently, village ordinances solely defend houses acknowledged on the Nationwide Register of Historic Locations or the State Register of Historic Locations.

The mansion was not listed on both.

A deconstruction staff from Habitat for Humanity beforehand eliminated some gadgets from the mansion and has been promoting them at ReStore places.

Alexander Eschweiler (left) and his Cornell University pal, The Alexander Eschweiler home, owned by Tim and Sue Frautschi in 1983 when this photo was taken, is constructed of red brick with Indiana limestone trim.This 1890s home at 1831 N. Cambridge Ave. was known as the Howard Greene House and was designed by Alexander Eschweiler. The home was razed and replaced by apartments.The 1906 Robert Nunnemacher house, at 2409 N. Wahl Ave., reflects Eschweiler's mastery of form and detail.The O.W. Robertson house, a striking fairy tale French chateau at 3266 N. Lake Drive, was designed by Chateau Eschweiler architects. The house was owned by Joseph and Lynde Martino in 1994, when this photo was taken.Joseph Pabst's three-story, five-bedroom home was designed

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This Eschweiler built home will be the featured homeThe Milwaukee home of Colin Scanes and his wife, Cate, is shown on Feb. 17, 2015. The historic 1894 Alexander Eschweiler-designed home is one of Eschweiler's earlier works.

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The staircase leading to the second level at the Eschweiler-designed home of Colin Scanes and his wife, Cate.

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This Alexander Eschweiler-designed home on Newberry Blvd.  is owned by Andrew and Laura Brusky.This home office is located on the second floor of the Brusky home on Newberry Blvd. The house was designed by Alexander Eschweiler

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Built-in bookcases surround the fireplace in the main living room of the Brusky home on Newberry Blvd. The house was designed by Alexander Eschweiler.

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The historic Gramling home sits in the South Layton Avenue district. The home built by Alexander Eschweiler.

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There are lots of interesting details in the Gramling house, like this cabinet tucked into a small corner outside the kitchen. The house was designed by Alexander Eschweiler.

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Built-in bookcases and windows frame the living room fireplace in the historic Gramling home built by Alexander Eschweiler.

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Windows surround the living room in the historic Gramling home built by Alexander Eschweiler.

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In 2009, Bill and Janice Doyle, who own several Bay View properties, came out of retirement to renovate this popular Alexander Eschweiler-designed  house at 2445 S. Kinnickinnic  Ave. The back of the property features an old coach house.

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A walk-through between the kitchen and the dining area is shown in the Alexander Eschweiler-designed home owned by Bill and Janice Doyle.

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A former administration building is one of four remaining buildings on the former Milwaukee County grounds designed by Alexander Eschweiler that are held by the University of Wisconsin Real Estate Trust. The building still stands solid but is in disrepair.An old gymnasium takes up the entire third floor of the historic administration  building designed by architect Alexander Eschweiler for the old Agricultural College. This photo was taken in 2011.

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Restoration specialists inspect an old science laboratory in the historic administration building designed by architect Alexander Eschweiler.

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People stop to tour the former engineering building of the Milwaukee County School of Agriculture and Domestic Economy, known as

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A space that will be a kitchen, dining area and great room in former Engineering building of the Milwaukee County School of Agriculture and Domestic Economy, known as

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Contact Mary Spicuzza at (414) 224-2324 or mary.spicuzza@jrn.com. Comply with her on Twitter at @MSpicuzzaMJS or Fb at https://www.fb.com/mary.spicuzza.

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